October 2 2015 Episode 7: When international travels and household disasters strike

Stephen and I return from an extended break, longer than anticipated, to discuss our travels and travails during our absence. We hope you enjoy, or at least don't hate it... too much:

Comments

Episode 7: When international travels and household disasters strike — Nightfox Sun Oct 04 2015 02:56 pm PDT


Stephen and I return from an extended break, longer than anticipated, to discuss our travels and travails during our absence. We hope you enjoy, or at least don't hate it... too much: http://techdorks.net/episodes/techdorks-2015-10-02-ep7.mp3

Interesting to hear about your travels. China is one country I haven't been to (yet), and it has been a while since I've been in Canada other than for a layover at an airport (usually YVR in Vancouver, B.C.).

Nightfox


Episode 7: When international travels and household disasters strike — Digital Man Sun Oct 04 2015 07:01 pm PDT


Re: Episode 7: When international travels and household disasters strike
By: Digital Man to TechDorks on Fri Oct 02 2015 04:43:11

Stephen and I return from an extended break, longer than anticipated, to discuss our travels and travails during our absence. We hope you enjoy, or at least don't hate it... too much: http://techdorks.net/episodes/techdorks-2015-10-02-ep7.mp3

Interesting to hear about your travels. China is one country I haven't been to (yet), and it has been a while since I've been in Canada other than for a layover at an airport (usually YVR in Vancouver, B.C.).

Cool. It's nice that work can take me to places I probably wouldn't go on my own. And for China, you need a visa (I'm not sure how that works for tourists). The long flights and car rides suck, and I'm not really a fan of being away from home and the family, but there is a positive side to it for sure.

Episode 7: When international travels and household disasters strike — Nightfox Mon Oct 05 2015 07:48 am PDT


Cool. It's nice that work can take me to places I probably wouldn't go on my own. And for China, you need a visa (I'm not sure how that works for tourists). The long flights and car rides suck, and I'm not really a fan of being away from home and the family, but there is a positive side to it for sure.

Yeah, traveling has its plusses and minuses. It definitely can be hard to be away from family; I'm not a big fan of long plane rides myself (mainly because I tend not to be able to sleep on an airplane).
I have a tourist visa for Brazil, which was fairly easy to get, but the ease
of getting one probably depends on the country. I was able to apply for & receive the Brazil visa by mail, but from what I've heard, some countries want you to visit their nearest consulate in the US in person to apply/interview for a visa.

Nightfox


Episode 7: When international travels and household disasters strike — Poindexter Fortran Mon Oct 05 2015 09:14 am PDT


Interesting to hear about your travels. China is one country I haven't been to (yet), and it has been a while since I've been in Canada other than for a layover at an airport (usually YVR in Vancouver, B.C.).

2600 magazine has a column called "The Telecom Informer"; the author spent the past 2 or so years in China building wireless infrastructures. Interesting to see how telecom evolves nowadays -- instead of running copper wires, they've jumped straight to wireless.


Episode 7: When international travels and household disasters strike — Mro Mon Oct 05 2015 04:14 pm CDT


2600 magazine has a column called "The Telecom Informer"; the author spent the past 2 or so years in China building wireless infrastructures. Interesting to see how telecom evolves nowadays -- instead of running
copper wires, they've jumped straight to wireless.


yeah, but wireless is slower than wired.


Episode 7: When international travels and household disasters strike — Digital Man Mon Oct 05 2015 03:55 pm PDT


Re: Episode 7: When international travels and household disasters strike
By: Digital Man to Nightfox on Sun Oct 04 2015 19:01:35

Cool. It's nice that work can take me to places I probably wouldn't go on my own. And for China, you need a visa (I'm not sure how that works for tourists). The long flights and car rides suck, and I'm not really a fan of being away from home and the family, but there is a positive side to it for sure.

Yeah, traveling has its plusses and minuses. It definitely can be hard to be away from family; I'm not a big fan of long plane rides myself (mainly because I tend not to be able to sleep on an airplane).

Me too. I made the mistake of a taking a sleeping pill during the return flight of my previous trip to China and all that did was turn my failure to fall and remain asleep into a torture exercise. That's the biggest difference (to me) for first and business class: you can actually fall and stay asleep.

I have a tourist visa for Brazil, which was fairly easy to get, but the ease of getting one probably depends on the country. I was able to apply for & receive the Brazil visa by mail, but from what I've heard, some countries want you to visit their nearest consulate in the US in person to apply/interview for a visa.

In my case, the Chinese company I was visiting sponsored the visa and my employer paid a travel/visa agent to file all the paper work and such. I imagine getting a visa for Cuba, Russia, or Syria, might be more difficult. :-)

Episode 7: When international travels and household disasters strike — Deuce Mon Oct 05 2015 03:49 pm PDT


yeah, but wireless is slower than wired.

Except when it's not.

Copper phone lines have a signal bandwidth of about 3kHz. Pretty much all wireless technology has a lot more (802.11b has 22MHz of signal bandwidth).

Generalizations like "wireless is slower than wired" are simply stupid.


Episode 7: When international travels and household disasters strike — Deuce Mon Oct 05 2015 05:17 pm PDT


I imagine getting a visa for Cuba, Russia, or Syria, might be more difficult.

For us Canadians, a visa to visit Cuba is pretty simple to get. It used to be fairly simple for an American to get one too (don't know about current law), the issue is returning to the USA, not going to Cuba.

I expect similar for Syria, but different for Russia.


Episode 7: When international travels and household disasters strike — Nightfox Mon Oct 05 2015 07:51 pm PDT


In my case, the Chinese company I was visiting sponsored the visa and my employer paid a travel/visa agent to file all the paper work and such. I

Yeah, I imagine it would be easier when you have a company sponsoring you.

imagine getting a visa for Cuba, Russia, or Syria, might be more difficult. :-)

:) I've heard the US government has been working on relaxing its relations with Cuba, so it might be easier to visit Cuba in the near future.

Nightfox


Episode 7: When international travels and household disasters strike — Mro Mon Oct 05 2015 10:37 pm CDT



:) I've heard the US government has been working on relaxing its relations with Cuba, so it might be easier to visit Cuba in the near future.


yeah but cuba isnt all it's cracked up to be.